artwork

No Artwork

Recently, I had a client that ran into some problems with the cover art for their project. It seems iTunes has some rather stringent (in my opinion) requirements for the cover art. Part of me understands that there needs to be some requirements or checks in place and I agree with Apple that people should not be 'misleading' in the representation of their music. But, I felt this particular case may have been a bit ridiculous. For those of you that want to know, here are the specs that I've found.

These things are required and will prevent you from releasing your music on iTunes:

We just pressed our first CDs that feature a QR code on the packaging. When the artist, songwriter Tonya Tyner, handed in her artwork, I didn't even know what the black and white square on the back of the digipak was. Now it seems like I am seeing them everywhere. When she told me that it was readable by smart phones and that you could have it link to a variety of functions, I thought it sounded like a great idea. In fact it sounded like such a good idea, I was kind of surprised that everyone wasn't already using them and that I had never heard of them.

This is the second installment of a series about Album Credits.  As this is just to help brainstorming, I will just make a list that recommended album credits to include on the artwork.  Hopefully this will help you remember to try to include everyone that worked on your product.

Front Cover

  • Album Title
  • Artist

Back Cover

I'm starting a several week installment talking about album credits.  Artwork on an album cover provides much more than just a pretty package to catch the eye of a browsing music fan.  It provides a place to tell a little more about your work, lyrics and production of the project.